Etched Works of Jacques Callot

  Collection   Etched Works of  Jacques Callot  at Candlewood Yankee Fine Arts Image

 

   Often not fully appreciated , the etched works of Jacques Callot, one of the most accomplished print makers of the
17th century, revolutionized the technique of etching.
 
   From a vast of subjects reaching from Princes  and the  Beggars – Paupers focuses on two poles of Callot’s work: his aristocratic commissions, and his images of the marginalized and impoverished.

 

 
 
   An international artist active in both France and Italy, Callot (1592–1635) was a consummate draftsman. His careful observations never fail to amaze viewers. Callot created more than 1,400 prints that reveal his fascination with a broad range of subjects, from the miseries of war to aristocratic pageantry; from saints to beggars; from biblical narratives and theatrical comedies to Gypsies and dwarfs.
 
 
 His prints often developed into series that explore a narrative or variations on a theme. Callot’s etchings, which are consistently imaginative, inventive, and witty, open a window through which to better understand 17th-century Europe. Still goof quality examples of his works can be found out side of the Convent  Museum Print Collections and small Public libraries .
 
 
Candlewood  Yankee opens the exhibition with over fifty works , priced from $ 50.00 and up . Great opportunity for the beginner and seasoned Collector to discover a great Italiam Master of lasting contribution to the Art Of Print Making and
the a Giant in the the History of Art .
 
Works can be seen at ;
 

http://stores.ebay.com/Candlewood-Yankee-Fine-Arts/_i.html?_nkw=callot&submit=Search&_sop=10&_sid=645563163

James Stow & Antony Yau
Candlewood Yankee Fine Arts

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